PUBLIC

PUBLIC, n. The whole body politic, or the aggregate of the citizens of a state, district, or municipality. Knight v. Thomas, 93 Me. 494, 45 A. 499. The inhabitants of a state, county, or community. People v. Turnbull, 184 Ill.App. 151, 155 ; Commonwealth v. Bosworth, 257 Mass. 212, 153 N.E. 455, 457. In one sense, everybody ; and accordingly the body of the people at large ; the community at large, without reference to the geographical limits of any corporation like a city, town, or county ; the people. In another sense the word does not mean all the people, nor most of the people, nor very many of the people of a place, but so many of them as contradistinguishes them from a few. Accordingly, it has been defined or employed as meaning the inhabitants of a particular place ; all the inhabitants of a particular place ; the people of the neighborhood. …

PRIVATE

PRIVATE – Affecting or belonging to private individuals, as distinct from the public generally. Not official; not clothed with office. People v. Powell, 280 Mich. 699, 274 N.W. 372, 373, 111 A.L.R. 721. As to private “Act,” “Agent,” “Bill,” “Boundary,” “Bridge,” “Business,” “Carrier,” “Chapel,” “Corporation,” “Detective,” “Dwelling House,’” “Easement,” “Examination,” “Ferry,” “Nuisance,’” “Pond,” “Property,” “Prosecutor,” “Rights,” “Road,” “Sale,” “School,” “Seal,” “Statute,’” “Stream,” “Trust,” “Water,” “War,” “Way,’” ‘Wharf,” and “Wrongs,” see those titles. – Black’s Law Dictionary 4th Edition | PAGE 1358

RACKETEERING

RACKETEERING – An organized conspiracy to commit the crimes of extortion or coercion, or attempts to commit extortion or coercion. From the standpoint of extortion, it is the obtaining of money or property from another, with his consent, induced by the wrongful use of force or fear. The fear which constitutes the legally necessary element in extortion is induced by oral or written threats to do an unlawful injury to the property of the threatened person by means of explosives, fire, or otherwise; and to kill, kidnap, or injure him or a relative of his or some member of his family. From the standpoint of coercion, it usually takes the form of compelling by use of similar threats to person or property a person to do or abstain from doing an act which such other person has the legal right to do or abstain from doing, such as joining a so-called protective association to protect his right to conduct …